While many Americans are cloistered inside their homes, transit workers are out there making sure that other essential workers can get to their jobsBy CATHY BUSSEWITZ AP Business WriterApril 12, 2020, 2:00 PM4 min readNEW YORK — While many Americans are cloistered inside their homes, transit workers are out there making sure that other essential workers can get to their jobs. But they often lack the masks or gloves they need to protect themselves from riders crowding onto buses and trains. The situation is so dire that Detroit bus driver Jason Hargrove took to Facebook on March 21 to express anger about a passenger who coughed repeatedly on the bus without covering her mouth. A few days later, Hargrove fell ill and died from COVID-19 on April 2. Thousands of transit workers have been infected and dozens have died from the fast-spreading disease, according to John Costa, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union, the largest labor union representing transit and allied workers in the U.S. and Canada. Costa, who started working for New Jersey Transit as a janitor at age 18, has been pushing the federal government to provide personal protective equipment to transit workers. He said his union members


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