When the coronavirus shuttered the hospitality industry in March, Chicago bartender Garrett Collins moved back home to Edmond, Oklahoma, where he now lives with his parents and a grandmother.”When I first moved in, I felt pretty guilty,” said Collins, 27. “I felt like I was very lucky and privileged in a way to have the ability to move back in with my parents. I felt guilty that I didn’t lock on to some career path that had made me able to look after myself on my own. When I moved back in, I had this kind of shame.”52 percent of people ages 18 to 29 are living with their parents because of the pandemic.Collins’ experience is part of the new normal. Across the country, the coronavirus has sent more than 2½ million young adults back into childhood bedrooms, according to a Pew Research Center report released this month, altering family dynamics and changing their life trajectories. It’s a dramatic sociological and economic shift.The report found that 52 percent of people ages 18 to 29 are living with their parents because of the pandemic.”The share of young adults living with their parents is higher than in any previous measurement (based on


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