Mark Murray 21h ago / 5:35 PM UTCWASHINGTON — As Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his presidential campaign Wednesday his ultimate downfall was that he never expanded beyond his progressive base.In fact, he ended up underperforming from 2016.That explains how he went from the frontrunner in a still-crowded race of Democratic candidates in February, to someone who couldn’t win a single county in Michigan or Florida when the field whittled down a month later.And while Sanders had to navigate a much larger field of viable candidates in 2020 than he did four years ago, his vote percentages underscore his difficulty in holding onto a sizable number of 2016 supporters who left his camp for other candidates.  Consider:In Iowa’s caucuses, the first Democratic contest, Sanders ended up getting 25 percent of the popular vote and 26 percent of the state delegate equivalents — down from 49.6 percent in 2016.In the New Hampshire primary, the second contest, the Vermont senator won the state with another 26 percent of the vote — down from 60 percent-plus four years ago.Bernie Sanders at a rally in Los Angeles on March 1, 2020.Jonathan Ernst / ReutersSanders’ best showing came in the next nominating race, Nevada, where he got


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